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Tag Archives: technology

The World is Changing Faster Than You Think

Thomas L. Friedman released an important book a few months ago called Thank You For Being Late: An Optimist’s Guide to Thriving in the Age of Accelerations. I usually take notes on the blank white pages in the back of a book. For a few seminal books, however, I actually type out key things God might be saying to me personally and as a leader. Thank You for Being Late was one of those books. My goal here is not to do a book review, but to share with you my top applications: We must be self-motivated, life-long learners. The world is changing at a pace so fast it has risen above the rate at which most people can absorb all the changes. Ray Kurzweil, director of engineering at Google, says it best: “The 21st century will be equivalent to 20,000 years of progress at today’s rate of progress; organizations have to be able. Read more.

Texting, Technology and the Church

A great book is so powerful that you stop reading, lower the book, and simply linger in the words for a moment. You ask God, “What might you be saying to me through this?” Reclaiming Conversation: The Power of Talk in a Digital Age by Sherry Turkle, was one such book for me. Turkle, a professor at MIT, has been studying people’s relationship with technology for 30 years. In Reclaiming Conversation, she looks at the first generation of children who grew up with smartphones now that they are graduating college and beginning to enter the workforce. She also examines the impact of technology on relationships with our families and friends, dating, teaching and education, and the workplace. My concern, like many of yours, is how this intersects with our work as pastors and leaders in the church. I do hope that you will read this 362-page work as it expounds on profound challenges before. Read more.

The Crisis of Discipleship

The explosion of change (e.g. the impact of new technologies) is happening so fast in Western culture that it is difficult to get perspective on its long-range impact in our churches. Willow Creek’s Reveal study, released in 2008, demonstrated conclusively that people are not experiencing spiritual transformation in our churches. Now seven years later, another comprehensive, multi-phase research study on The State of Discipleship in the United States has been released by the Barna Group. Their findings confirm the continuing crisis around discipleship. The study is so important that I want to highlight a few applicable points for you to consider: Only 1% of church leaders say “today’s churches are doing very well at discipling new and young believers.” Few believe churches – their own or others –are excelling in this area. Participation in discipleship activities (e.g. Sunday school, spiritual/mentoring group Bible study) is weak – as low as 20% in our churches. The. Read more.

The 10 Commandments of Technology and Team

My good friend, Lance Witt, has written Ten Commandments for our use of technology that are well-worth disseminating to your team. He expounds on them in chapter 40 of his book, Replenish:Leading from a Healthy Soul. 1. Thou shalt not use e-mail to deliver bad news. 2. Thou shalt not put anything in e-mail that you mind being forwarded…because it probably will. 3. Thou shalt not e-mail (or chat on-line) during meetings. 4. Thou shalt not use “bcc.” 5. Thou shalt be more personal than professional. 6. Thou shalt keep e-mails short and to the point. 7. Thou shalt not text or take calls while in conversation or in a meeting. 8.Thou shalt not call or e-mail people on their day off. 9. Thou shalt use e-mail for prayer and encouragement. 10. Thou shalt give phone/e-mail/Facebook/Twitter (etc.) a Sabbath. What might you add to this list? …read more

The 10 Commandments of Technology and Team

My good friend, Lance Witt, has written Ten Commandments for our use of technology that are well-worth disseminating to your team. He expounds on them in chapter 40 of his book, Replenish:Leading from a Healthy Soul. 1. Thou shalt not use e-mail to deliver bad news. 2. Thou shalt not put anything in e-mail that you mind being forwarded…because it probably will. 3. Thou shalt not e-mail (or chat on-line) during meetings. 4. Thou shalt not use “bcc.” 5. Thou shalt be more personal than professional. 6. Thou shalt keep e-mails short and to the point. 7. Thou shalt not text or take calls while in conversation or in a meeting. 8.Thou shalt not call or e-mail people on their day off. 9. Thou shalt use e-mail for prayer and encouragement. 10. Thou shalt give phone/e-mail/Facebook/Twitter (etc.) a Sabbath. What might you add to this list?

Technology, Enroe and the Rain Forest

While in Malaysia, Geri and I spent two wonderful days at Mt. Kinabalu National Park in the midst of the Borneo rainforest, the oldest rainforest in the world. Enroe was our “ranger guide,” leading us in our hikes during those two days. We learned a lot from Enroe. He grew up in the rainforest and never saw a city until he was sixteen (He is now thirty). He told us about his mother using particular leaves and plants to stop bleeding or ease fevers. He talked with us about his village, their rhythms, their foods and their culture. He talked about his first visit to a big city at the age 16 and how overwhelming it was. (His city visits even now can only last an hour). We learned a lot from Enroe as he slowly and thoughtfully answered our questions and tried to digest the complexity of our lives in New York City.. Read more.