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Sabbath: 4 Countercultural Practices to Start and Keep a Biblical Sabbath

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Tag Archives: stopping

Embracing God’s Rhythms

Theologian Robert Barron argues, at the heart of original sin is the refusal to accept God’s rhythm for us. God gave Adam and Eve enormous freedom in the Garden. Then, without explanation, God set a boundary before them. They were not to eat from the tree of the knowledge of good and evil (Gen.2:15-17). They were to trust and surrender to Him, bowing humbly before His incomprehensible ways. They were to be active, then passive. They were to work, then they were to surrender in trust. They were to be active, and then they were to let go. The essence of being in God’s image is our ability, like God, to stop. We imitate Him by stopping and resting. For this reason, when we stop to practice Sabbath each week, or the Daily Office (fixed hour prayer) each day, we touch something deep within us as image-bearers of God. How are your rhythms today?. Read more.

Midday Prayer: The Gift of Pilgrimage

Silence, Stillness, and Centering before God (2 minutes) Scripture Reading – Psalm 84 1 How lovely is your dwelling place,    O LORD Almighty! 2 My soul yearns, even faints, for the courts of the LORD; my heart and my flesh cry out for the living God. 3 Even the sparrow has found a home, and the swallow a nest for herself, where she may have her young— a place near your altar, O LORD Almighty, my King and my God. 4 Blessed are those who dwell in your house; they are ever praising you. 5 Blessed are those whose strength is in you, who have set their hearts on pilgrimage. 6 As they pass through the Valley of Baca (i.e. trouble) they make it a place of springs; the autumn rains also cover it with pools. 7 They go from strength to strength, till each appears before God in Zion. Devotional Both the king. Read more.

Sabbath: Feasting at God’s Banquet

Scripture describes our future as the wedding feast of all wedding feasts. We will see Jesus face to face and be united with him in a massive love and joy that will last forever. On Sabbath, a 24 hour period set apart from our work, we participate in that feast. Thomas Aquinas, in the twelfth century, talked about our craving for a happiness that is so boundless that it is almost terrifying. Sabbath slows us down to satisfy that hunger beneath all our hungers. Christianity is not about what we have to do as leaders – “Do this. Go here. Serve this person. Go the extra mile for the work.” The Christian life is enjoying a feast, a banquet with the living God. There are few greater gifts we can give the people we serve than to stop and experience that feast on Sabbath. And we look forward to our eternal Sabbath when we. Read more.

Sabbath: Feasting at God's Banquet

Scripture describes our future as the wedding feast of all wedding feasts.  We will see Jesus face to face and be united with him in a massive love and joy that will last forever. On Sabbath, a 24 hour period set apart from our work, we participate in that feast. Thomas Aquinas, in the twelfth century, talked about our craving for a happiness that is so boundless that it is almost terrifying. Sabbath slows us down to satisfy that hunger beneath all our hungers. Christianity is not about what we have to do as leaders – “Do this. Go here. Serve this person. Go the extra mile for the work.” The Christian life is enjoying a feast, a banquet with the living God. There are few greater gifts we can give the people we serve than to stop and experience that feast on Sabbath. And we look forward to our eternal Sabbath when we. Read more.

Yearly Sabbatical with the Trappists

For the last few years I have approached my vacations as ‘mini-sabbaticals”, seeking to structure my time according to Sabbath principles – Stopping (work), Resting, Delighting and Contemplating God. Part of what this has meant for me the last few years, besides thinking through vacations much more purposefully so that my soil gets fresh nutrients from God through doing holy “nothing”, has been to take a few days alone with the Trappists in St. Joseph’s in Spencer Massachusetts. When this blog is posted, I will be there. Why and what will I be doing? The 60-70 monks, who live as a strict Benedictine community on a 1 by 3 mile plot of land, have taken vows of stability, poverty and conversion of life (celibacy and obedience to the authority of the Abbot). Their lives are so far from contemporary American Christianity that I find my days with them drive me to Jesus, to simplicity, to. Read more.