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Tag Archives: planning

The Road Less Traveled

My recent discussions with pastors and leaders around the release of The Emotionally Healthy Leader with the continued expansion of The EHS Course has brought to light how massive and all-encompassing a paradigm shift EHS is. This is nowhere more evident than in how we define success and make decisions. The faulty belief that “bigger is always better” is deeply embedded in us. We forget that the most important thing is to do God’s will, in his way, in his timetable. How do we do that as leaders? Consider the following chart, adapted from chapter 6 in The Emotionally Healthy Leader to help you start: Let me also invite you to The Emotionally Healthy Leadership Conference 2016, April 20-21 (The Leader’s Marriage Conference – April 19), to be equipped more fully on what it will look like to bring this kind of deep, beneath the surface spirituality to you, your leadership and your church.. Read more.

EH Leader Podcast: Emotionally Healthy Planning And Decision Making

We make plans and decisions every day as leaders. God’s leaders have been making plans and decisions without him since the beginning.  How healthy is your practice of planning and decision making in your leadership? Join Pete and Rich in this month’s edition of the Emotionally Healthy Leadership Podcast as they discuss this pivotal leadership theme. View the video below to watch the conversation or listen to the audio file by using the player below.

The Three Greatest Dangers in Planning and Decision Making

We make plans and decisions every day as leaders. Three great dangers, however, often torpedo our best intentions and efforts: We Define Success Too Narrowly In churches, we tend to define success by such things as attendance, finances (giving, meeting or exceeding budget, etc.), decisions for Christ, baptisms, numbers participating in small groups or other ministry programs, etc. If we work for a non-profit or in the marketplace, we might measure increased market share, program expansion, or numbers of people served. When the numbers are up, we’re successful; when the numbers are down, we’re not. Numbers can be valid as a measure of fruitfulness for God, but using numbers to define success is not without its dangers. The problem is when the portion of our time and energy devoted to thinking about external issues far exceeds the amount of time and energy we devote to internal measures of transformation such as the depth of. Read more.

Patience, Planning, and 2015

At the turn of every New Year, I do two things. First, I step back to prayerfully consider: What might God want us/me to do in 2015? What are the 5-6 measureable goals He is inviting us/me to focus on in 2015? Which is the most important? The second most important? Etc. Secondly, I remember Tertullian’s (160-220 AD) keen insight on patience: Tertullian writes: “Impatience is, as it were, the original sin in the eyes of the Lord. For, to put it in a nutshell, every sin is to be traced back to impatience. I find the origin of impatience in the Devil himself.” In a brilliant essay entitled “Of Patience,” he expounds on a truth we rarely talk about – i.e. God’s nature to be patient. “When the Spirit of God descends,” he writes, “Patience is His inseparable companion. If we fail to welcome it along with the Spirit, will the latter remain. Read more.

How Emotional Healthy is Your Planning and Decision Making?

For years I wondered, “How is Christian planning and decision-making different? How do I safeguard we are “carrying out plans” that are God’s and not our own (Isaiah 30:1)? The integration of the word Christian with planning and decision-making was much more challenging than I imagined. Health is best measured on a continuum. Use this brief assessment to get an idea of where you are today. Next to each statement, write down the number that best describes your response. Use the following scale: 5 = Always true of me 4 = Frequently true of me 3 = Occasionally true of me 2 = Rarely true of me 1 = Never true of me _____ 1.      Discernment and the doing of God’s will is my most important work as a leader. _____ 2.       I am acutely aware of the temptation to pursue more opportunities than God intends because of my own shadow or the pressure. Read more.

EHL Conference 2014 and The Emotionally Healthy Leader

This year’s Emotionally Healthy Leadership Conference will be different this May for a number of reasons. First, I’ve been intensely writing my new learnings since 2007 in a new book called The Emotionally Healthy Leader that will be released in early 2015.  I have narrowed it down to four critical areas that must be established (i.e. our inner life) if we are going to lead our churches well (i.e. our outer life). These reflections, tested over the past seven years, will inform our conference.  The outline is as follows: Your Inner LifeChapter 2    Face Your ShadowChapter 3    Lead out of Your Marriage or SinglenessChapter 4    Slow Down for Loving UnionChapter 5    Practice Sabbath DelightYour Outer LifeChapter 5     Planning and Decision MakingChapter 6     Culture and Team BuildingChapter 7     Community and Dual RelationshipsChapter 8.    Endings and New Beginnings (A Case Study of Succession) Secondly, God has led Geri and I into other new content around leading out of your marriage. Read more.