mobile
Blog
7
Apr

Why Can’t We Slow Down?

Posted on April 7th, 2015

Slowing down can be terrifying because doing nothing productive leaves us feeling vulnerable, emotional exposed and naked. Overworking hides these feelings of inadequacy or worthlessness, not just from others but also from ourselves.

As long as we keep busy, we can outrun that internal voice that says things like:

I am never good enough.

                  I am never safe enough.

                  I am never perfect enough.

                  I am never extraordinary enough.

                  I am never successful enough.

Do you recognize that voice?

Far too many of us use workaholism to run from these shaming messages. I count myself among them, though I would consider myself more of a recovering workaholic at this point.

When meeting someone for the first time we usually ask, “What do you do?” We ask because, in our time and culture, identity is defined in large part by occupation or job title. It is how we typically define ourselves and how we understand our place in the world. We also classify and value people based on what they do.

Part of who we are is what we do. God is a worker, and we are workers as well. But that it is not the deepest truth about who we are. We are first of all human beings. But when things get switched around and our role or title becomes the foundation of our identity, we are reduced to human doings. And when that is the case, slowing down for God, ourselves, and for others becomes almost impossible to do.

Sadly, I’ve discovered that this distorted concept of identity can be found from Asia to Latin America, from North America to Africa, from the Middle East to Europe.

Let me invite you to join us at The EH Leadership Conference 2015 April 22-23 through a Free LiveStream as we talk about how to slow down, not only ourselves, but our entire ministry for God. In doing so, we position our ministries to have a powerful, long-term impact for Christ in our world. Click here to register

-Pete

Share This Post: icon icon icon

Subscribe

Enter your email address:

Categories

Archive

connect with us: